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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in immigration reform and, above all, in what we have to do to invest to grow our economy and grow opportunity. >> pelley: you know, i don't think gun safety would have been at the top of the president's agenda two months ago but after newtown, of course, it has become -- >> it's impossible to turn away from it now. it's impossible. >> pelley: which leads to the question: what do you expect to see from the president in terms of resolve on this as we get farther from the tragedy itself? >> well, i think you saw in the president's announcement, i think it was last week after the vice president's series of recommendations, what the contours of his proposal will be in terms of an assault weapons ban, a limitation on access to military style clips with multiple rounds in them. i think he's shown consistently a willingness to reach out to gun owners, sports men and women and hunters to make sure their interests are respected, consistent not just with the second amendment but consistent with their reasonable interests. but i think the idea of insisting that we do what we can as a federal and as state
the count kraoe which has not occurred. we are more divided than before. and get the economy on a surround recovery to get out of a recession that we've had. the pieces of business hangover the president. he has proven that you can get reelected in a weak economy, which a lot of people, myself included thought would be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also cou
for the markets and the economy? >> i hope so. if what the republicans are talking about is let's have this debt ceiling skirmish every quarter, every three months, nobody is going to like that, especially the markets, and for very good reason. if what they're say something we're not going to play debt ceiling leverage anymore, which has obviously been the president's position, that's good. my feeling is it's probably the latter. i think there are enough kind of economic grown-ups in the room to really control the folks who have threatened to use that kind of leverage. >> but the senate has not had a budget resolution pass through the senate in, what is it, four years now? >> april, 2009. >> that feels to me pretty shameful frankly. i don't know the politics and i'm not exactly sure why that's the case, but isn't that a critical step in bridging the gap and making progress on these issues where you can not go to these sort of extra legal things like using the debt ceiling as leverage, but you can use the process as it is intended to be used. >> i agree, and it's an interesting quid pro quo for t
: that is interesting. the president campaigned keeping the economy going. improving it. spreading the benefits to the middle class. immigration reform and energy reform. then newtown happened and that wasn't part of his agenda for the second term. then newtown happened and by all signs the president was deeply and personally moved. one of the reasons i suspect you can see there just to, standing to the left of them the fatherf two young daughters and the idea of these 20 young schoolchildren having been unabouted down i'm sure hit him very bern p personally. he decided to make that a huge issue in this campaign or rather in his second administration. it will be interesting to see. one of the things people say you don't want to overload the agenda but in addition everything he wants to do and obviously the debt and deficit he will have several battles with congress over that but gun control, he will try to take advantage newtown has happened and perhaps caused a tippingpoint in public attitudes and he will push that very aggressively. shepard: senator chuck schumer, the chairman of joint congr
to do. but he needs to get to work. and the number one problem is the economy. he's got to fix the economy. the fiscal situation has been fixed, to a large extent. the stock market's doubled. that's pretty good. but he has to get everybody working again. it means fix the economy. it means fix the education. so we're bringing kids along that have the skills for 21st century america. his focus has to be on the economy. on the need to reduce unemployment. and frankly, i hope he can, through his own example, restore a sense of civility in the country. >> every president learns a lot. is scarred by the office. also made more wise by the office. what is the one thing you hope president obama has learned over the last four years? >> i hope he's learned that you know, no one part of the government, really, gets it all done. and so, he's got to do a better job of reaching out to members of congress, across both -- across the aisle, to the republicans. and the republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. why aren't republican leaders shouting out about all thi
that the economy is in a fair to poor shape. you have two thirds of them who believe the country is headed in the wrong direction. the president wants to, as we said earlier, look forward rather than backwards and talk about his vision for the country and his inaugural remarks. neil: you are noticing the biden family coming in here. peter, you mentioned earlier how much was made about joe biden and his remarks yesterday. calling himself the president of the united states. it was a typical joe biden. nobody criticized him. he did have a number of prominent officials at his own swearing-in. he is planning to do something. i do not know with or without hillary clinton. what did you make of that? peter: he is obviously not running again. he had about a dozen family members at his swearing-in at the national observatory. had something like 120-130 people, including those folks from south carolina, iowa and new hampshire. the vice president very smart politician. would probably like to leave the door open, potentially. again, we will see. neil: all right. we will see, indeed. you are looking at
to be done on the economy and a great many other things. nora o'donnell, the co-anchor of "cbs this morning" is down on the national mall and she has insight on what the president is looking to in a second term. >> that's right. on a day like this when most americans have expressed their frustration with washington, political leaders, this is day that we see hundreds of thousands of americans turn out to witness this piece of history. every second-term president since dwight eisenhower has had to deal with an opposition party in congress. that's nothing new that president obama is facing in this second term. but he's going to try and capture i think some of the magic of bipartisanship on a day like today. trying to put it in a bottle. because he really has a very ambitious agenda for his second term. we have heard him talk about it. gun safety, immigration reform. deficit reduction and those looming spending cuts that are a part of the sequestration. so that's lot before the president. but as major has noted this is a speech today that's not about specifics, but setting the tone and trying
, of course the economy. but how does all of that fit? how does that come into something that is coherent? as a vision for the next four years and as a strategy of getting those things achieved. i think that will be great to hear. and to be reflective. what have we learned in the last four years? he came in with high expectations, and he can address some of the divisions that existed in the country politically. he can address domestic and foreign policy issues that were affecting the country. what has he learned about what it takes now and what he will have to do and what his administration will have to do, and what is counting on the american people to do to make his agenda come to fruition? host: the president and vice- president are currently at service at st. john's episcopal old church, just run the corner of the white house. their it is on your screen. we will watch them as they go out. approximately 45 minutes -- 15 minutes more in the service before the exit the church. jane in jacksonville, florida, a democrat's line. please go ahead. caller: first of all, good morning. i want to
the economy, create jobs. ultimately, his presidency in the short-term is going to get judged by a lot of people by simply that, right? how much money they have in their pocket, what's the status of the economy, does this thing, the economy takeoff in the next four years? like a lot of economists think, at some point if we get past congress and the fights, get out of the way, that it might actually do that. >> chuck, is there an accepted template for presidents trying to turn personal likability into policy success? obviously, you have to deal with the other party in congress to the extent they have power and to the extent that they have strategy for working with you or against you, but is there a way the presidents can marshall the way people feel about them personally into getting what they want in washington? >> well, i think that this president has been trying different ways. you know, if you look at -- let's just look at the various interrations of ofa, obama for america, now organizing for action, it is completely outside the democratic party. the other two versions part of the d
't number 2 million. the history of this administration has already been made. but also the economy isn't in a fr fr freefall. it doesn't feel as dire as it did. >> as you mentioned, this is one of these moments. this is one of the symbols that we who love this democracy cherish so much. the president using this opportunity. we talk about the big moments in a presidency. this is one of them. i'm told this is an inaugural address that will be forceful and will be short. this is a president who has had to change in office, perhaps down scale his ambitions on that goal he set out four years ago about changing the culture of washington. that is the unfinished business. but he meets at this hour with the bipartisan congressional leaders of congress. a symbol of bipartisanship when so many americans want to see the reality of bipartisanship. four more years, so the constitution says he gets here, but the political calendar is a lot shorter. he has a finite amount of time to get what he wants to get done done. >> chuck todd is standing by at the white house. our chief political correspondent,
-- of the president's second term, especially as it relates to jobs and the economy. all right. so stay right with us because there is a lot going on. a lot of great, political faces to see. like peter king's right behind us. if you like the academy awards and you like politics, this is the place to be. don't go away. >>>> jennifer: welcome back to current tv's coverage of president barack obama's inauguration. we've got bill press who's on the parade grounds or on the grounds of the mall. we've got michael shure in portland, oregon. watch this feed right here of the presidential motorcade coming from the white house to the capitol and in fact, my favorite bit of presidential inauguration trivia is about the carriage that was built to transport martin van buren to his inauguration in 1837. that carriage, unlike this cadillac, was constructed of timber from the dismantled u.s.s. constitution. can you imagine that? that carriage, obviously being hugely symbolic. very, very exciting moment as the motorcade arrives. >> john: i spent a lot of time in d.c. this year. if i could have unobstructed traffic to
economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. together we discovered that a free market only -- and fair play. together we resolve that a great nation must care for the vulnerable and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortunes. through it all we have never relinquished, nor have we succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiatives and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constant in our character. we have always understood that when times change so must we. that fidelity to our funding principles requires new responses to new challenges. our individual requires collective action, the american people can no more meet the demands of today's world by acting alone than american soldiers that met the forces of fascism or communism with musicales and militias, no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future or builds the roads and networks an
some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something that really bothers the president. >> this is a speech that talks about values. he's going to try to paint a vision for his next term. the danger is if he's too broad. it won't be memorable. so how does he keep it tight, have memorable lines, maybe a quotable nugget that we can take with us like blue states and red states, the united states of america. it's a high bar to set, but he's done it before. >> jessica, you've been covering him for a long time at the white house. is this a different man than he was four years ago, a different politician, a different president? >> we always saw barack obama, there was the professor, and there was barack obama, the competitor. since he's been in office, we've seen barack obama, the competitor, emerge as a more dominant force. barack obama, the competitor, plays to win. we've
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)